Spam No Longer a Big Headache for Users, Avira Finds
Article by George Norman
On 26 May 2011
Avira, company that offers home and business security software solutions and is best known for its free antivirus product, conducted a survey with the aim to see how much of a headache spam is for regular users. The conclusion was that spam is not such a big headache as it used to be in the past.

The questions “Do you use anti-spam on your PC or laptop?” and “How much spam do you receive on a daily basis?” were presented to Avira’s 100 million customers during March and April 2011. Not all of them answered, you can imagine; enough provided an answer so that Avira can get a picture of the state of things.

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A grand total of 2,329 users responded to the “Do you use anti-spam on your PC or laptop?” question and out of them all, the larger part said they use anti-spam. And more to the point, 45% said they use anti-spam and are satisfied with the product.

A grand total of 2,236 users responded to the “How much spam do you receive on a daily basis?” question. The larger part, 72%, said they get less than 10 spam messages per day and 14% said they get some 25 spam messages per day. 4% of respondents said that they get some100 spam messages per day and 6% said they get more than 100 spam messages per day.

The conclusion of this survey is obvious. The larger part of users take advantage of the functionality anti-spam products have to offer and it shows, as most of them get less than 10 spam messages per day.

“The Spam landscape has clearly changed in the last two years with the take down of a couple of major botnets,” said Sorin Mustaca, data security expert at Avira GmbH. “Considering the fact that almost all email providers have a form of spam filtering installed on their servers, end-users receive only what the anti-spam solutions on the servers don’t catch. What really surprised me was that 45% of the users answered that they have an anti-spam solution on their computers and that they are satisfied with it. Overall, there is clearly work to be done within the security industry to get rid of 100% of all spam emails, but progress is being made.”



Tags: Avira, Security, Spam
About the author: George Norman
George is a news editor.
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