Microsoft's PhotoDNA Technology Adopted by Facebook
Article by George Norman
On 27 May 2011
First, the introduction, to make sure that everyone is on board: PhotoDNA is technology developed by Microsoft alongside Dartmouth College, technology that aids in uncovering and removing photos of child sexual exploitation. The PhotoDNA technology was donated by Microsoft to the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC) to help fight the distribution of child-exploitation images. Microsoft implemented PhotoDNA in several of its products, mainly Bing, SkyDrive and Hotmail.

Now its time for the news: Facebook has recently announced that it joined Microsoft in sublicensing the technology for use on its network. Or to put it in other words, Facebook announced the implementation of PhotoDNA technology on its network, thus joining Microsoft and The National Center for Missing & Exploited Children in the fight against online child exploitation.

Sponsored Links

And now its time for some words from top figures at Microsoft and NCMEC. First up, here is what Microsoft’s Bill Harmon (Associate General Counsel, Microsoft Digital Crimes Unit” had to say about Facebook implementing PhotoDNA:

“Facebook’s bold step forward to become the first online service provider to join Microsoft in partnership with NCMEC on the PhotoDNA program sends a strong message: We will not tolerate the use of our services to victimize children in this way when we have the technology to do something about it. We hope that Facebook’s adoption of PhotoDNA serves as a springboard for other online service providers to take advantage of the opportunity available through NCMEC’s PhotoDNA program and, in fact, we know that others are exploring the possibility right now.”

Ernie Allen, president and CEO of the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, said that the fact that Facebook decided to implement PhotoDNA is proof that Facebook is commited to keeping children from being victimized. “I wrote in 2009 that PhotoDNA will revolutionize the work we’re doing in the fight against child pornography, a prediction that is borne out by Facebook’s adoption. But to truly realize that revolution, this technology is needed on many online services – only then will the Internet become a hostile environment for those who would exploit and abuse children,” added Allen.



Tags: Microsoft, PhotoDNA, Facebook, National Center for Missing & Exploited Children, NCMEC
About the author: George Norman
George is a news editor.
You can follow him on Google+, Facebook or Twitter

I Hope you LIKE this blog post! Thank you!
What do YOU have to say about this
blog comments powered by Disqus
Popular News
By George Norman on 29 Apr 2016
Your productivity goes out the window and your interest in reading serious news about serious topics drastically diminishes, the closer we get to the end of the week.
By George Norman on 28 Apr 2016
Google introduced a new, machine translation service called Google Translate precisely 10 years ago, on April 28, 2006. Few used it back then. It's grown in popularity since then - a lot!
Related News
By George Norman on 22 Dec 2015
If you thought that everyone has an iPhone or some other device that runs Apple’s iOS mobile operating system, Nielsen says otherwise. According to the research firm, Android is the top smartphone OS.
By George Norman on 04 Feb 2016
Facebook just turned 12. On this joyous occasion, here's a dozen interesting and amazing facts about the biggest and most popular social network in the world.
By George Norman on 11 Apr 2016
The Redstone update for Windows 10 has been rebranded as the Windows 10 Anniversary Update. It's the next major Windows 10 update and it will come with plenty of exciting new features.
By George Norman on 05 Jan 2016
Seeing that is offered as a free upgrade and that Microsoft is aggressively asking customers to upgrade, it comes as no surprise that Windows 10...
Sponsored Links
Hot Software Updates
Top Downloads
Become A Fan!
Link To Us!
Microsoft's PhotoDNA Technology Adopted by Facebook
HTML Linking Code