Microsoft Offers Top Dollar for Rustock Info
Article by George Norman
On 19 Jul 2011
Seems that Redmond-based software giant Microsoft is set to take down Rustock, the notorious spamming botnet that had an estimated 1 million infected computers operating under its control, and everyone connected with the botnet.

We are not going to focus on the fact that the Microsoft Digital Crimes Unit (DUC), in cooperation with industry and academic experts, took down the botnet in March. We are not going to focus on the fact that the Rustock botnet stayed down and did not come back to life since then. Nor are we going to focus on the fact that Microsoft published notices in two Russian newspapers informing Rustock operators that they are being sued, event though all of these show Microsoft’s commitment to taking down Rustock and associated parties.

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We are going to focus on something else – mainly, the fact that Microsoft is willing to pay top dollar for Rustock info. And more to the point, Microsoft announced that it will pay a $250,000 reward for information that could help it identify, arrest and convict the ones who controlled the Rustock botnet. Or to put it in other words, Microsoft will pay a quarter of a million dollars to find out who the operators of the Rustock botnet are.

So if you have info that can lead to the identification, arrest and criminal conviction of Rustock operators, you could be $250K richer. All you have to do is get in touch with Microsoft via email at avreward@microsoft.com. Microsoft explained that because the Rustock botnet had an international impact, residents of any country are eligible for the reward pursuant to the laws of that country.

“This reward offer stems from Microsoft’s recognition that the Rustock botnet is responsible for a number of criminal activities and serves to underscore our commitment to tracking down those behind it,” commented Richard Boscovich, Senior Attorney, Microsoft Digital Crimes Unit. “While the primary goal for our legal and technical operation has been to stop and disrupt the threat that Rustock has posed for everyone affected by it, we also believe the Rustock bot-herders should be held accountable for their actions.”

Additional info on Microsoft’s $250K reward is available in this PDF file.



Tags: Microsoft, Security, Botnet, Rustock
About the author: George Norman
George is a news editor.
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Microsoft Offers Top Dollar for Rustock Info
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