Facebook Closes Inmates Accounts, at California's Request
Article by George Norman
On 10 Aug 2011
When you’re a free man, you can go where you want and do what you want. You can even spend all day surfing the web and updating your Facebook status if that’s what you want to do. But if you’re an inmate, you can’t do that – at least part of it. You can’t go where you want and you can’t do what you want, but you can still browse Facebook and update your status. The figures prove it. There are reports that say that more than 7,200 inmates in California have a contraband phone and can access the popular social networking site.

The state of California wants to prevent inmates from accessing Facebook. After a California prison inmate, a convicted child molester, used Facebook to view the pages of his victim from behind bars, the authorities asked Facebook to begin closing the accounts of California inmates. If the Facebook account of an inmate is updated while he is in prison, that account has to be shut down because it means the inmate has found a way to access the account (the contraband phones I mentioned above).

Sponsored Links

Even if a family member updates a California inmate’s Facebook status, that’s reason enough to shut the account down. You see, Facebook's policies prohibit an individual other than the registered user from updating a Facebook account.

"We will disable accounts reported to us that are violating relevant U.S. laws or regulations, or inmate accounts that are updated by someone on the outside," Facebook spokesman Andrew Noyes said in a statement.

According to the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR), with the help of Facebook, the accounts of at least two prisoners have been shut down. The CDCR and Facebook will continue the search for accounts that have been accessed by inmates while they were in prison and will shut them down as well.

Having access to social media is a means of circumventing a prison’s monitoring process, explained CDCR Secretary Matthew Cate. With access to mobile phones and social media, the inmates can continue their criminal activities from behind bars. But by cooperating with Facebook, the CDCR can help protect the community and may even be able to prevent future crimes.



Tags: Facebook, Security, California, CDCR
About the author: George Norman
George is a news editor.
You can follow him on Google+, Facebook or Twitter

I Hope you LIKE this blog post! Thank you!
What do YOU have to say about this
blog comments powered by Disqus
Popular News
By George Norman on 27 May 2016
You shouldn’t throw away electronics in the trash, you should dispose of them responsibly. This infographic explains why you should that and presents some useful advice on how to do that.
By George Norman on 27 May 2016
The launch trailer for Blood and Wine, the final Witcher 3 expansion. The new live-action trailer for Deus Ex: Mankind Divided. The new trailer for Ghost Recon Wildlands. And the first reveal trailer for...
Related News
By George Norman on 04 Feb 2016
Facebook just turned 12. On this joyous occasion, here's a dozen interesting and amazing facts about the biggest and most popular social network in the world.
By George Norman on 07 Apr 2016
The web is abuzz with news about WhatsApp and how it added end-to-end encryption. If you don’t know what that means, then let me address any questions you may have about this topic.
By George Norman on 11 Feb 2016
Security company BullGuard presents the main reasons why someone might be tempted to hack a Facebook account, offers safety tips on how to keep your account secure, and invites you to get a...
By George Norman on 18 Jan 2016
WhatsApp just announced that it is dropping the annual subscription free, making the messaging app free for everyone. Wait, does that mean the app will start to pester you with ads?
Sponsored Links
Hot Software Updates
Top Downloads
Become A Fan!
Link To Us!
Facebook Closes Inmates Accounts, at California's Request
HTML Linking Code